News

Starbucks: guns don’t go with coffee

Starbucks: guns don’t go with coffee

Photo: Reuters

By Lisa Baertlein

(Reuters) – Coffee chain Starbucks Corp has asked U.S. customers to leave their guns at home after being dragged into an increasingly fractious debate over U.S. gun rights in the wake of multiple mass shootings.

While many U.S. restaurant chains and retailers do not allow firearms on their properties, Starbucks’ policy had been to default to local gun laws, including “open carry” regulations in many U.S. states that allow people to bring guns into stores.

In August, this led gun-rights advocates to hold a national “Starbucks Appreciation Day” to thank the firm for its stance, pulling the company deeper into the fierce political fight.

Locations for Starbucks Appreciation Day events included Newtown, Connecticut, where 20 children and six adults were shot dead in an elementary school in December. Starbucks closed that shop before the event was scheduled to begin.

Chief Executive Howard Schultz said in an open letter to customers late Tuesday that Starbucks Appreciation Day events “disingenuously portray Starbucks as a champion of ‘open carry.’ To be clear: we do not want these events in our stores.”

The coffee chain did not, however, issue an outright ban on guns in its nearly 7,000 company-owned cafes, saying this would potentially require staff to confront armed customers.

The Seattle-based company hoped to give “responsible gun owners a chance to respect its request,” Schultz said.

The CEO told Reuters the policy change was not the result of the Newtown Starbucks Appreciation Day event, which prompted the Newtown Action Alliance to call on the company to ban guns at all of its U.S. stores. Nor was it in response to the mass shootings this week at the Washington Navy Yard.

“We’ve seen the ‘open carry’ debate become increasingly uncivil and, in some cases, even threatening,” Schultz wrote, noting that “some anti-gun activists have also played a role in ratcheting up the rhetoric and friction,” at times soliciting and confronting employees and patrons.

“We found ourselves in a position where advocates on both sides of the issue were using Starbucks as a staging ground for their own political position,” said Schultz, who in the past has willingly waded into the public debate over the U.S. national debt and gay marriage.

Schultz said more people had been bringing guns into Starbucks shops over the last six months, prompting confusion and dismay among some customers and employees.

“I’m not worried we’re going to lose customers over this,” he told Reuters. “I feel like I’ve made the best decision in the interest of our company.”

Starbucks’ request does not apply to authorized law enforcement personnel.

Recent Headlines

in Entertainment

This weekend in entertainment history

Fresh
seinfeld

A look back on some of Hollywood's most memorable headlines.

in Sports

Game 7 showdown in West finals welcomed by Ducks, Blackhawks

Fresh
Chicago Blackhawks center Brad Richards (91) waits for linesman Jean Morin, left, to release the puck in a face-off against Anaheim Ducks center Nate Thompson during the first period of an NHL hockey game in Anaheim, Calif., Saturday, Jan. 31, 2015.

One year after the Anaheim Ducks and the Chicago Blackhawks both exited the playoffs with a loss in a seventh game, they're facing off in Game 7 of the Western Conference finals on tonight at Honda Center.

in Sports

Lightning strike: Tampa Bay beats Rangers, will play for Cup

Tampa Bay Lightning center Tyler Johnson (9) and New York Rangers defenseman Ryan McDonagh (27) battle for the puck during the second period of Game 4 of the Eastern Conference final during the NHL hockey Stanley Cup playoffs in Tampa, Fla., Friday, May 22, 2015. The Rangers won 5-1.

The Tampa Bay Lightning will play for the Stanley Cup, winning their third straight game at Madison Square Garden 2-0 on Friday night to beat the New York Rangers in the Eastern Conference finals in seven games.

in Sports

Belichick avoids direct answers on deflated footballs

New England Patriots head coach Bill Belichick, left, speaks with offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels during an NFL football organized team activity Friday, May 29, 2015, in Foxborough, Mass.

Coach Bill Belichick is shedding little light in his first public remarks since the Wells report on the Patriots' use of underinflated footballs.

in Sports

Magic hire former player Scott Skiles as head coach

Milwaukee Bucks head coach Scott Skiles questions a call during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Indiana Pacers Saturday, Jan. 5, 2013, in Indianapolis.

The 51-year-old Skiles becomes the 12th coach in franchise history. He follows Jacque Vaughn, who was fired in February.

Bellingham Traffic