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U.S. job growth weakest in 3 years

U.S. job growth weakest in 3 years

ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in the Manhattan borough of New York Jan. 8. Photo: Reuters/Lucas Jackson

By Lucia Mutikani

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. employers hired the fewest workers in almost three years in December, but the setback was likely to be temporary amid signs that cold weather conditions might have had an impact.

Nonfarm payrolls rose only 74,000 last month, the smallest increase since January 2011, and the unemployment rate fell 0.3 percentage point to 6.7 percent, the Labor Department said on Friday. The unemployment rate was the lowest since October 2008 and in part reflected people leaving the labor force.

The step back in hiring is at odds with other employment indicators that have painted an upbeat picture of the jobs market. The data showed that 38,000 more jobs were added in November than previously reported.

Construction employment fell for the first time since May and leisure and hospitality payrolls rose marginally, suggesting that cold weather in some parts of the country had held back hiring. There were also declines in government employment.

The smaller survey of households showed an increase in the number of people who stayed at home because of the bad weather.

Economists polled by Reuters had expected job gains of 196,000 jobs last month. But many pushed up their forecasts in the wake of upbeat labor market data during the week.

A string of data – from consumer spending and trade to industrial production – has suggested the economy ended 2013 on strong footing and is positioned to gain even more strength this year.

The change in the economy’s fortunes, which gave the Federal Reserve confidence last month to start dialing back its massive monetary stimulus, reflects waning fiscal uncertainty after lawmakers in Washington agreed on a two-year budget.

The labor force participation rate, or the proportion of working-age Americans who have a job or are looking for one fell 0.2 percentage point to 62.8 percent.

Annual revisions to the data from the Labor Department’s survey of households, which is used to calculate the jobless rate, showed minor changes to the rate.

The U.S. central bank announced in December that it would trim its monthly purchases to $75 billion from $85 billion, and many economists expect it to decide on a similar-sized cut at its next meeting on January 28-29.

Growth this year is expected to top 3 percent, a sharp acceleration from the 1.7 percent forecast for 2013.

Last month government payrolls fell 13,000 after rising 15,000 in November.

Manufacturing employment rose for a fifth straight month. The number of construction jobs fell 16,000.

Employment in the retail sector accelerated from November’s seven-month low, which economists had blamed on a late Thanksgiving. There were also payroll gains in professional and business services.

Average hourly earnings rose two cents. The length of the workweek fell to 34.4 hours from 34.5 hours.

WALL STREET TO EDGE UP EVEN AS PAYROLLS DISAPPOINT

By Rodrigo Campos

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Stocks were set to rise slightly at the open on Friday even as the December jobs report came in much weaker than anticipated.

Equity futures sharply pared gains after data showed U.S. employers hired in December only 74,000 workers, the smallest increase since January 2011.

“That’s what markets do,” said John Canally, investment strategist and economist for LPL Financial in Boston.

“You have a bunch of traders sitting there looking at a number they don’t know anything about, they see a weak number and they hit ‘sell'; and when people take a look through it again they will reconsider.”

The data setback was likely to be temporary, however, amid signs that cold weather conditions might have had an impact.

“It looks like it’s a weather issue,” Canally said. “The Fed will see through it as a weather issue. I don’t think they will change after one month of anything bad or good – so they are going to stay the course.”

Investors are still viewing economic data through the eyes of the Federal Reserve, trying to gauge the pace at which it will continue to reduce its monthly stimulus.

After the post-data drop, S&P 500 futures rose 5 points and were above fair value, a formula that evaluates pricing by taking into account interest rates, dividends and time to expiration on the contract. Dow Jones industrial average futures rose 41 points and Nasdaq 100 futures added 11 points.

At their session high, S&P futures rose more than 9 points.

Alcoa reported a massive quarterly loss on Thursday after recent declines in aluminum prices; its shares fell 6.6 percent in premarket trading.

Sears Holdings Corp’s shares fell 11.6 percent in light premarket trading a day after the retailer reported steep declines in comparable-store sales at its Kmart and U.S. namesake chain for the crucial holiday season.

Shares of trucking company YRC Worldwide fell 21.5 percent in premarket trading a day after sliding 16 percent after workers represented by the Teamsters union rejected a contract extension that the company proposed, putting a plan to restructure its debt in jeopardy.

Target Corp said a massive payment card data breach that occurred during the first three weeks of the holiday shopping season affected up to 70 million people, far more than previously estimated. Its shares fell 1.3 percent premarket.

(Editing by Bernadette Baum. Reporting By Lucia Mutikani; Editing by Andrea Ricci)

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